Adams represented Richland District in the S.C. House of Representatives from 1836 to 1849 and in the S.C. Senate from 1850 to 1853. On December 11, 1854, the General Assembly elected Adams governor. Read the Entry »

Adger became one of the wealthiest and most influential merchants of antebellum Charleston, and he used his position to good effect in the affairs of the city. Read the Entry »

Advocating “the Gospel of Freedom,” African Methodist ministers have played important roles as secular leaders. Read the Entry »

Aiken owes its existence to the South Carolina Railroad, its personality to its erstwhile “winter colony” of wealthy northern sports enthusiasts, and its economic vitality and relatively cosmopolitan spirit to the U.S. government’s massive Savannah River Site nuclear weapons facility. Read the Entry »

The house and its outbuildings are one of the most complete and best preserved urban domestic complexes of the antebellum era. Read the Entry »

As a Unionist, Governor Aiken opposed the radical views of Robert Barnwell Rhett and members of the so-called “Bluffton Movement,” which called for secession if Texas was not annexed to the United States as a slave state. Read the Entry »

In 1828 he launched his formal political career and won election to the S.C. House of Representatives, where he represented Prince George Winyah Parish from 1828 to 1831. He was subsequently involved in several disputed elections involving the Prince George Winyah S.C. Senate seat, in large part because of his staunch support of nullification. Read the Entry »

Allston's philosophy of art elevated the image of American artists from mere artisans to romantic idealists. Read the Entry »

Much like another prominent nineteenth-century political figure, James Chesnut, Alston is primarily remembered as the husband of his legendary wife. Read the Entry »

Ansel was the first person of German ancestry to occupy the governor’s chair in South Carolina. Read the Entry »

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