Adams’s books and stories about the African American residents of lower Richland County brought him both regional and national attention as an author who was able to present the black dialect with great precision, and also as a white author who unhesitatingly portrayed the hardships of racial prejudice in the 1920s and 1930s. Read the Entry »

In 1896 Adams entered the junior class at South Carolina College (later the University of South Carolina), after graduating from Leesville College in 1892. She was awarded a bachelor of arts degree in 1898, the first woman to graduate from South Carolina College. Read the Entry »

Allan’s most popular creation was “Boysi,” a comical, stereotypical black servant getting his way with his white employers. Read the Entry »

Although Allen spent only six of his sixty years in the state, his association with the Poetry Society of South Carolina came at a crucial time in his development as a writer. Read the Entry »

Anderson’s eclectic repertoire and engaging personality brought him national attention during the folk music revival of the early 1960s. Read the Entry »

Ansel was the first person of German ancestry to occupy the governor’s chair in South Carolina. Read the Entry »

Babcock’s writings continued their popularity years after his death. A reviewer from the New York Times once compared his writing to “a rare old Bourbon you want to make last as long as possible.” Read the Entry »

In 1891 Babcock became superintendent of the South Carolina State Lunatic Asylum in Columbia, its first to have been trained in psychiatry. Babcock arrived eager to modernize and improve the institution. Read the Entry »

Bacot kept a diary but recorded little about her hospital work. Published many years after her death, the diary provides insight into the social life of a single, young, upper-class southern woman during the Civil War. Read the Entry »

During her accomplished career as a children’s librarian with the New York Public Library, Baker received the first Dutton-Macrae Award in 1953 for advanced study of library work with children. In 1980 Baker joined the University of South Carolina (USC) and became “Storyteller-in-Residence.” This position was created for Baker, and her goals were to teach others how to create enthusiasm in children about stories and reading. Read the Entry »

Page 1 of 3912345...102030...Last »